Stone Coal Studio

Stone Coal Studio

Monday, March 27, 2017

Small Works Weekly: Far Meadow


Far Meadow
by Judith F Lochbrunner
acrylic on painter paper
6 x 6 inches

Thank you for checking my blog here at blogspot.  I have moved my blog to my website: stonecoalstudio.com

To find today's post please click stonecoalstudio.com/blog

There is also an option to receive email updates of the blog at this new address. Click on "Follow the Blog" on the upper right of the blog page.   I appreciate your taking the time to sign up again or for the first time.


Hope to see you soon at the blog page on my website. 

Thursday, March 23, 2017

A Visit to the Art Exhibit: American Impressionism in the Garden


Thank you for checking my blog here at blogspot.  I have now moved my blog to my website: stonecoalstudio.com

To find today's post please click stonecoalstudio.com/blog

There is also an option to receive email updates of the blog at this new address as well.  Look for the "Follow this blog" link at the top right of the blog page.   I appreciate your taking the time to sign up again or for the first time.


Hope to see you at the blog page on my website.

Thank you!

Monday, March 20, 2017

Small Works Weekly - Rural Development



Thank you for checking my blog here at blogspot.  I have moved my blog to my website: stonecoalstudio.com

To find today's post please click stonecoalstudio.com/blog

There is also an option to receive email updates of the blog at this new address as well.  I appreciate your taking the time to sign up again or for the first time.

Hope to see you soon at the blog page on my website. 

Thursday, March 16, 2017

The Challenge of Photographing Art Outside


There are good days and there are bad days, and this is one of them.
            
                                                                 --Lawrence Welk


With a return to winter this week in the Mid-Atlantic,  I have been spending much many hours in the warm studio trying to paint a commission work and to finish one last (big) painting for the upcoming "Spring Sensations" Art Show.

Happily the 36 x 26 inch painting was completed a few days ago.  I have it sitting on the easel so I can look, look again, and look often to determine if anything needs to be changed, added or eliminated.   And it may indeed be finished.

Unfortunately the cold temperatures with gusty winds made it impossible to set up to photograph outside on Wednesday (It is too big for me to do inside).  I set-up this afternoon as the winds have died down but I am not totally happy with the result.  However, I will post the photo I have and not delay my regular Thursday blog any longer.  

***Update -- I have replaced the photo with one that more closely resembles the painting.  It took three attempts and yes, it is a (good) learning process.  



Yellow Upstart
by Judith Flynn Lochbrunner
acrylic on canvas
36 x 36 inches

This painting will be included in the "Spring Sensations Art Show with the Double Line Painters of the Blue Ridge from April 4-June 30, 2017 at 2nd Helpings Gallery.   We promise an art show as fresh as Spring!

Thank you for stopping by my blog.  

Please note that the blog is moving to a permanent spot on my website: at stonecoalstudio.com/blog










Monday, March 13, 2017

Small Works Weekly: The Working Landscape



The Working Landscape
by Judith F Lochbrunner
acrylic/mixed media
8 x 8 inches

The abstracted landscape series continues and this latest painting uses a limited palette (or number of colors).  It also utilizes a wider variety of shapes including much smaller ones.   

There is one overlook off the Blue Ridge Parkway that looks over Bedford County, specifically the town of Montvale.   A few industrial sites can be seen which is a good reminder that the area is not all farms and fields but places to build, supply, manufacture and warehouse.  I created an industrial-looking series of small shapes to become the focal point. 

And true to its title "working landscape"; the painting may still be a work in progress as I am still deciding if it is finished. 

Thank you for stopping by my blog.  

Please note the new blog address .

(It can also be found on my website stonecoalstudio.com)




Thursday, March 9, 2017

Sow Some Seeds in the Garden and in Art

Look around for a place to sow a few seeds.
                                                          -Henry Van Dyke


Farmhouse Shadows 
by Judith F Lochbrunner
acrylic on canvas
 ( Carillon Clinic Art Collection)

The countdown to spring is on and gardeners here are starting seeds under the lights inside to get a jump start on the season.  Heirloom tomato and sweet peppers seeds have been placed on top of lightweight potting mix in shallow trays.  The seeds are then covered with poultry grit (crushed limestone) to allow air circulation and some light to promote germination and healthy seedlings.  



(All those delicious tomatoes and sweet peppers start here each March.)


Sowing seeds is a metaphor for becoming an artist.  Nothing can or will happen without starting with basic steps.  Time, proper care and perseverance are also important in creating art for display and sale.

Seeds have an estimated harvest date, art has no such guarantee.   But when it happens the matching of the art and the collector brings great joy.

The Dr. Robert L.A. Keeley Healing Arts Program at Carillon Clinic celebrated many artists with a tea on March 6, 2017.  At the tea the publication of "Healing Arts in the Blue Ridge" which is a compilation of representative works from Carillon Clinic's Art Collection was presented.



(Each artist whose work is represented in the book received a copy.)


(Farmhouse Shadows is featured on page 71.)

Sometimes the "harvest" is something quite unexpected and so much more.

Thanks for stopping by my blog.  

PS Please look for a new blog address later this month.  




Monday, March 6, 2017

Mat or Frame?: Small Works Weekly


Mountain Lines
by Judith F Lochbrunner
mixed media on canvas
10 x 8 inches

Presentation is an important part of any art display.  While some artists may choose to be non-traditional and use pushpins in the wall, I along with others want to show my art in the best and most practical way.

The presentation needs a practical side to keep the work from being damaged.  It also needs to be easy to hang.   There is also the less defined side of an appropriate presentation.  By this I mean that the art needs to be displayed in a manner which shows off its best qualities.  

Should the art be in a frame and what type of frame should be used?  Should it be big, small, modern, or traditional?  The choice for framing is endless.  

Or should the art be matted with a protective clear bag to allow the buyer to choose?  The clear bag protects the art from handling.  The mat provides a simple but elegant presentation to show the art at its best.

But how does the artist choose without knowing who will purchase the piece?  The only answer seems to be to provide both options for collectors.


(Paintings that include "Mountain Line" are matted and ready for delivery to Goose Creek.)

The painting at the top of this post along with other framed work will be delivered to Goose Creek Studio in Bedford tomorrow.  Hopefully my collectors will find the right one in the right presentation or have the frame shop at Goose Creek frame it to their preference.

Do you have a favorite way to purchase art?  Please share in the comments at the end of this post.

Thank you for stopping by my blog.

PS:  Look for as new blog address coming soon.  My goal is to move it by the end of March but I will be sure to post at this web address so you will have plenty of prior notice.